LIMITED NEW YEARS SALE ENDS SOON! Stock is limited. Free shipping on orders $30+. Take an extra 10% off your first order → View Promo Here.

When Do Babies Start Teething : 17 Signs To Look Out For

When Do Babies Start Teething : 17 Signs To Look Out For

As a new mother, one of the most common questions you may ask yourself is when to expect your baby to start teething. Teething is a normal and natural process that all babies go through as they grow and develop. However, the timing of when a baby will start teething can vary greatly from child to child.

In this article, we will discuss the general timeline for when babies start teething, the signs and symptoms to look out for, and the potential causes of delayed or early teething. You can also find a short video from the EXPERTS regarding this topic.

When Do Babies Start Teething : 17 Signs To Look Out For

  1. Increased drooling: As babies begin to teethe, they produce more saliva, which can lead to excessive drooling.

  2. Gum swelling and redness: The gums may become swollen and red as the tooth buds push through.

  3. Chewing on objects: As babies start to feel discomfort in their gums, they may begin to chew on objects in an effort to relieve the pressure.

  4. Fussiness and irritability: Teething can cause discomfort and pain, which can lead to increased fussiness and irritability in babies.

  5. Loss of appetite: Teething may cause babies to lose their appetite due to discomfort while eating.

  6. Biting and gnawing: As teeth start to emerge, babies may begin to bite and gnaw on objects to help the tooth break through the gums.

  7. Swollen and tender gums: As teeth begin to emerge, the gums may become swollen and tender to the touch.

  8. Crying and whining: Teething can cause babies to cry and whine more than usual due to the discomfort and pain.

  9. Rubbing or pulling on ears: Some babies may rub or pull on their ears as a sign of teething, as the pain can sometimes be mistaken for an earache.

  10. Low-grade fever: Some babies may develop a low-grade fever as a sign of teething, as the body's immune system works to fight off any potential infection from the tooth breaking through the gums.

  11. Diarrhea: Teething can cause changes in the digestive system, leading to diarrhea as a symptom.

  12. Runny nose: Teething can cause a runny nose as babies may drool more, leading to more mucus production in the nose.

  13. Coughing: Teething can cause a baby to cough as drool may run down the back of the throat.

  14. Rashes around the mouth: Teething can cause rashes around the mouth as a result of constant drooling.

  15. Troubles sleeping: Teething can cause discomfort and pain, which can lead to trouble sleeping for babies.

  16. Refusing to eat: Some babies may refuse to eat as a sign of teething, as the discomfort and pain may make it difficult to eat.

  17. Refusing to drink: Some babies may refuse to drink as a sign of teething, as the discomfort and pain may make it difficult to swallow.

 

General Timeline for Teething

Most babies will start to show signs of teething around 6 months of age. This is when the first primary (milk) teeth, also known as the lower central incisors, will typically begin to emerge. However, some babies can start teething as early as 3 months old, while others may not start until they are 12 months old.

The process of teething can take several weeks or even months, as the tooth slowly pushes through the gums. After the lower central incisors, the upper central incisors will typically emerge, followed by the lateral incisors, first molars, canines, and second molars. By the time a baby is 3 years old, they will typically have a full set of 20 primary teeth.

 

Signs and Symptoms of Teething

As a baby's tooth begins to emerge, they may experience a range of symptoms that can indicate they are teething. Some common signs and symptoms of teething include:

  • Drooling: This is a normal part of the teething process as the baby's salivary glands will produce more saliva to help lubricate the gums.
  • Sore or swollen gums: The gums may become sore and swollen as the tooth pushes through.
  • Crying and fussiness: The discomfort of teething can cause a baby to cry and be fussy.
  • Biting and gnawing: As the baby's gums feel sore, they may try to relieve the discomfort by biting or gnawing on things.
  • Loss of appetite: Teething can make it uncomfortable for a baby to eat, which may lead to a loss of appetite.
  • Low-grade fever: This is a common symptom of teething, but it is usually not serious and goes away on its own.

 

It's important to note that not all babies will experience all of these symptoms, and some babies may not show any signs of teething at all.

 

Potential Causes of Delayed or Early Teething

While most babies will start teething around 6 months of age, there are some factors that can cause a baby to start teething earlier or later than this.

Early teething: A baby may start teething earlier than 6 months if they are born with a genetic predisposition to early tooth development. Other potential causes of early teething include premature birth and certain medical conditions.

Delayed teething: A baby may start teething later than 6 months if they are born with a genetic predisposition to delayed tooth development. Other potential causes of delayed teething include malnutrition and certain medical conditions.

It's important to note that delayed or early teething is not typically a cause for concern, and most babies will develop a full set of teeth within the normal time frame.


How to Help Your Baby During the Teething Process

As a mother, you want to do everything you can to help your baby feel comfortable during the teething process. Here are some tips on how to help your baby during this time:

 

  • Give them something to chew on: Providing your baby with a teething toy or a clean washcloth that has been chilled in the refrigerator can help to soothe their sore gums. Avoid using anything that can break into small pieces, as this can be a choking hazard.
  • Use teething gels: Teething gels can be applied to the baby's gums to help numb the pain and discomfort. However, it is important to use these products as directed, and avoid overuse as it can numb the baby's tongue and make it hard for them to eat.
  • Use pain relievers: If your baby is in a lot of pain, you can give them a small dose of over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen. Be sure to follow the dosage instructions on the label and never give your baby aspirin.
  • Massage their gums: Gently massaging your baby's gums with a clean finger can help to relieve discomfort and stimulate blood flow to the area.
  • Keep them hydrated: As your baby will likely be drooling more during the teething process, it is important to keep them well hydrated to prevent dehydration.
  • Distract them: If your baby is fussy and uncomfortable, try to distract them with a new toy or activity.

 

Teething and Sleeping

Teething can also affect your baby's sleep patterns. As their gums are sore, they may wake up more frequently at night and have trouble falling asleep. Here are some tips to help your baby sleep better during the teething process:

 

  • Stick to a consistent bedtime routine: Having a consistent bedtime routine can help to signal to your baby that it is time to sleep.
  • Create a comfortable sleeping environment: Make sure your baby's sleeping area is comfortable, with the right temperature and a dark and quiet environment.
  • Try different sleeping positions: Some babies may find it more comfortable to sleep in a certain position, such as on their stomach or with a pacifier.
  • Use white noise: White noise can help to create a soothing environment that blocks out other distracting sounds.
  • Don't hesitate to ask for help: If your baby's teething is causing them to wake up frequently at night and you're finding it difficult to cope, don't hesitate to ask for help from a partner or family member.

 

Teething and Feeding

Teething can also affect your baby's feeding habits. As their gums are sore, they may be less interested in eating or have trouble breastfeeding or taking a bottle. Here are some tips to help your baby continue to eat well during the teething process:

 

  • Offer soft foods: Offer your baby soft foods such as pureed fruits and vegetables, yogurt, and oatmeal.
  • Use a cold spoon: Offering a cold spoon to your baby can help to numb their gums and make it more comfortable for them to eat.
  • Avoid hard or crunchy foods: Hard or crunchy foods can be difficult for your baby to chew and may cause further discomfort.
  • Be patient: Teething can make your baby less interested in eating, so it is important to be patient and not force them to eat.
  • Consult your pediatrician: If your baby is experiencing significant feeding difficulties or significant weight loss, it is important to consult your pediatrician to rule out any underlying issues.

 

Teething and Oral Care

As your baby's teeth begin to emerge, it is important to start a proper oral care routine to ensure that their teeth and gums are healthy. Here are some tips for oral care during the teething process:

  • Start cleaning your baby's gums: Even before the first tooth emerges, it is important to start cleaning your baby's gums to remove any bacteria and food particles. You can use a soft, damp cloth or a baby toothbrush with water.
  • Use a small amount of fluoride toothpaste: As soon as the first tooth emerges, you can start using a small amount of fluoride toothpaste (about the size of a grain of rice) to clean your baby's teeth.
  • Help your baby learn to spit: As your baby gets older, it is important to teach them to spit out the toothpaste after brushing, to prevent them from swallowing too much fluoride.
  • Schedule regular dental check-ups: It is important to schedule regular dental check-ups for your baby, as soon as their first tooth emerges. This will help to ensure that their teeth and gums are healthy and that they are on track for proper oral development.



Teething and Developmental Milestones

As babies go through the teething process, it is important to be aware of the potential impact it may have on their developmental milestones. Here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Delays in speech development: As babies begin to develop their first teeth, they may become less vocal and have difficulty making certain sounds. This is because their mouths are sore and they may be hesitant to use their tongue and lips.
  • Changes in appetite: As mentioned earlier, teething can make it uncomfortable for a baby to eat, which may lead to a loss of appetite. This can cause delays in growth and development.
  • Changes in behavior: Teething can cause a baby to become more fussy and irritable. This may cause them to become more clingy and less interested in exploring their environment.
  • Delays in motor skills: As babies become more focused on relieving the discomfort of teething, they may become less interested in practicing their motor skills such as crawling, walking and grasping.

 

It's important to note that while these delays may occur, they are typically temporary and your baby will catch up once they are through the teething phase.

 

Teething and Illness

During the teething process, it is not uncommon for babies to develop a low-grade fever as their body fights off the infection caused by the tooth erupting through the gums. However, it is important to be aware of the signs of a more serious illness such as an ear infection or a respiratory infection, which can also occur during teething. Symptoms such as high fever, severe ear pain, coughing and runny nose are not typical of teething and should be evaluated by a pediatrician.

 

Teething and Teething Remedies

There are many teething remedies available over the counter, but it's important to be aware of the potential risks and benefits of each one.

 

  • Teething rings: Teething rings are a popular choice as they are easy to hold, they can be chilled in the refrigerator to soothe the gums, and they come in a variety of textures to help massage the gums.
  • Teething gels: Teething gels contain a mild anesthetic to numb the gums and can be applied directly to the gums. However, it is important to use these products as directed and avoid overuse as it can numb the baby's tongue and make it hard for them to eat.
  • Teething tablets: Teething tablets contain a homeopathic remedy and are placed under the baby's tongue to dissolve. However, the FDA has issued a warning against the use of these tablets due to the lack of scientific evidence to support their effectiveness and potential safety concerns.
  • Teething necklace: Teething necklaces are worn around the baby's neck and are made of various materials such as silicone or wood. They are intended to provide relief to the baby by gnawing on the necklace. However, it is important to ensure the necklace is safe to be worn by babies, as the necklace can be a choking hazard.

 

In conclusion, teething is a normal and natural process that all babies go through, however, it can be a difficult time for both babies and parents. By being aware of the signs and symptoms of teething, as well as how to help your baby during this process, you can make the experience more comfortable for your little one. Additionally, by starting a proper oral care routine and scheduling regular dental check-ups, you can ensure that your baby's teeth and gums are healthy and that they are on track for proper oral development. If you have any concerns about your baby's teething, it is always best to consult with your pediatrician.

Georgia Picardal

Georgia Picardal, author

Related Articles


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published