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8 Common Baby Teething Syndrome

8 Common Baby Teething Syndrome

8 common baby teething syndrome presents the natural causes during this developing process.

Baby teething syndrome is a natural process that all infants go through as their primary teeth start to emerge through their gums.

The process usually begins around 6 months of age and can continue until the child is about 2 years old.

During this time, parents may notice a variety of symptoms, including drooling, biting, and fussiness, as the baby's gums become swollen and tender.

While these symptoms can be uncomfortable for the baby, they are a normal part of the teething process and do not typically require medical intervention. You can watch the video at the bottom the article for additional information!

8 Common Baby Teething Syndrome

  1. Drooling: As the baby's teeth begin to push through the gums, they may experience an increase in saliva production, leading to excessive drooling.
  2. Irritability: Teething can cause discomfort and pain, which can make babies fussy and irritable.
  3. Sore or swollen gums: As the teeth push through the gums, they can cause inflammation and soreness in the gums.
  4. Chewing or biting on objects: As the baby's teeth begin to emerge, they may want to chew or bite on objects to alleviate discomfort in their gums.
  5. Loss of appetite: The discomfort and pain associated with teething can make it difficult for babies to eat or drink.
  6. Sleep disturbances: Teething pain can make it difficult for babies to sleep, leading to restlessness and wakefulness.
  7. Fever: Teething can cause a low-grade fever in some babies.
  8. Diarrhea: Teething can cause digestive upset and lead to diarrhea in some babies.

Cameron Sze, Clinical Nurse Educator, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

woman carrying a baby boy in the park during the sunset

Symptoms of Baby Teething Syndrome

Teething is a natural process that occurs in all babies, but it can be accompanied by a variety of symptoms.

These symptoms can vary in intensity and duration, and they can also be different for each baby.

Understanding the common symptoms of teething can help parents to better prepare for and manage this stage of development.

  • The most common symptom of teething is discomfort or pain in the gums. As the tooth buds begin to push through the gums, they can cause inflammation and pressure on the surrounding tissue. This can lead to discomfort, soreness, and even pain. Parents may notice that their cute baby girl is more irritable than usual, and that they are more likely to cry or fuss. They may also notice that their baby boy is more clingy, and that they want to be held more often.
  • Another common symptom of teething is drooling. As the tooth buds begin to push through the gums, they can cause the salivary glands to produce more saliva. This increased production of saliva can lead to drooling, which can be especially heavy during the teething process. Parents may notice that their baby's clothes are constantly damp, and that they are constantly wiping drool from their baby's face.
  • Parents may also notice that their baby is more interested in putting things in their mouth. As the tooth buds begin to push through the gums, they can cause a lot of discomfort and pressure. To alleviate this pressure, babies may begin to chew or suck on anything they can get their hands on, such as toys, pacifiers, or even their own fingers.
  • Some babies may experience a low-grade fever during the teething process. This is caused by the inflammation in the gums and can be accompanied by other symptoms such as swollen gums and redness. Parents should be aware of this symptom, but it is important to remember that fever can also be a sign of other illnesses and should be evaluated by a pediatrician if it persists or reaches a high temperature.

Alonzo H. Thornton, Director of Nursing, Wellpath

mother playing with his baby girl in the backyard on a sunny day

Causes of Baby Teething Syndrome

The causes of baby teething syndrome are related to the natural process of tooth development in infants and young children.

Teething is the process by which a baby's first set of teeth, known as primary teeth, begin to emerge through the gums.

This process typically begins around 6 months of age and can continue until the child is around 3 years old.

  • The primary cause of baby teething syndrome is the emergence of the primary teeth through the gums. As the tooth buds begin to push through the gums, they can cause inflammation and discomfort in the gums. This can lead to a variety of symptoms, such as sore gums, drooling, and an increased interest in putting things in the mouth.
  • As the tooth buds push through the gums, they can cause pressure and pain in the gums. This pressure can also cause the gums to become swollen and inflamed, which can lead to further discomfort for the baby.
  • Hormonal changes can also play a role in the development of baby teething syndrome. During the teething process, the body releases hormones that can cause the gums to become more sensitive and swollen. This can lead to an increase in the pain and discomfort associated with teething.
  • In some cases, teething can also be caused by an underlying medical condition. For example, a baby with a fever or an ear infection may experience teething symptoms even though their teeth have not yet emerged. In these cases, it's important to consult with a pediatrician to rule out any underlying causes for the symptoms.
  • Certain predispositions can also cause teething to be more painful or prolonged. For example, if a baby has a family history of teething problems, or if they are born prematurely, they may experience more severe teething symptoms. In these cases, it's important to consult with a pediatrician to determine the best course of treatment.

Racheal W.Credentialing Coordinator, Tenet Healthcare

mother looking at her baby lying down on a white textile at the beach

Diagnosis and Treatment of Baby Teething Syndrome

Diagnosis and treatment of baby teething syndrome is typically done by a pediatrician.

The first step in diagnosing teething is to identify the symptoms, which can include sore gums, drooling, and an increased interest in putting things in the mouth.

If a parent is unsure if their baby is teething, they should consult with a pediatrician to rule out any underlying causes for the symptoms.

  • To diagnose teething, a pediatrician will typically examine the baby's mouth and gums. They may also take an X-ray to check for any visible tooth buds. In some cases, a pediatric dentist may also be consulted to determine the best course of treatment.
  • Once a diagnosis of teething is made, a pediatrician will typically recommend a variety of treatment options to help alleviate the symptoms. These can include:
  • Pain relievers: Over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen can help to alleviate the pain and discomfort associated with teething. However, it's important to consult with a pediatrician before giving any medication to a baby.
  • Topical gels: There are a variety of topical gels that can be applied to the gums to help alleviate pain and discomfort. These gels can include numbing agents, such as lidocaine, or natural remedies, such as chamomile.
  • Teething rings: Teething rings are designed to be placed in the baby's mouth to provide a source of pressure and relief for the gums. They can be made of rubber, plastic, or wood and can be chilled in the refrigerator to provide added relief.
  • Massaging the gums: Gently massaging the baby's gums with a clean finger can also help to alleviate pain and discomfort.
  • Diet Changes: Some babies may be more prone to teething pain if they are also experiencing constipation or other digestive issues. In these cases, a pediatrician may recommend changes to the baby's diet to help relieve the symptoms.

Not all babies will experience teething symptoms, and some may experience them more severely than others.

Consult with a pediatrician to determine the best course of treatment for your baby. Remember that teething is a normal and natural process, and there is no way to prevent it.

But, there are a few things parents can do to help alleviate the symptoms and make the process more comfortable for their baby.

Elisabeth CollinsOccupational Health Nurse Practitioner, Chi Health

mother in a yellow floral dress with a baby girl hugging indoors

Prevention of Baby Teething Syndrome

Preventing baby teething syndrome is not possible as teething is a normal and natural process that all babies go through.

However, there are steps parents can take to help alleviate the symptoms and make the process more comfortable for their baby.

  • Keep the baby's gums clean: At home, regularly cleaning the baby's gums with a damp washcloth or a soft-bristled toothbrush can help to remove bacteria and plaque that can cause inflammation and discomfort.
  • Use a teething ring: Teething rings can provide a source of pressure and relief for the gums. They can be made of rubber, plastic, or wood and can be chilled in the refrigerator to provide added relief.
  • Massage the gums: Gently massaging the baby's gums with a clean finger can also help to alleviate pain and discomfort.
  • Try natural remedies: Some natural remedies such as chamomile tea or a clove oil can be used to ease teething pain. However, parents should consult with a pediatrician before using any natural remedies.
  • Diet Changes: Some babies may be more prone to teething pain if they are also experiencing constipation or other digestive issues. In these cases, a pediatrician may recommend changes to the baby's diet to help relieve the symptoms.
  • Proper oral hygiene: Even though babies do not have teeth, it is important to practice good oral hygiene. This includes wiping the baby's gums with a damp cloth or a finger brush after each feeding.
  • Avoid exposing the baby to harsh chemicals: Parents should avoid using products that contain harsh chemicals, such as alcohol or menthol, on the baby's gums. These can irritate the gums and make the pain and discomfort worse.
  • Be observant: Parents should be observant of their baby's behavior and look out for any signs of discomfort or pain. This will help them to identify when the baby is teething and take appropriate action.

Jonathan BlanchardProduct Director, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals

Georgia Picardal

Georgia Picardal, author

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